Driving

Millennium City is bordered by the Detroit River on the South and the Millennium Highway, known locally as “The Loop,” on the West, North, and East. The only way to cross the Loop is one of the eight “gates” located along the highway. No other roads cross the Millennium Highway.

The “Smart Roadway” system used inside the Loop is one of the most notable unique features of Millennium City. The smart roads have two distinctive features. First, heating elements built into the roadways keep them clear of snow, ice, or standing water. The heat sensors activate automatically when their built-in sensors detect precipitation. Second, transmitters along all roads communicate with the Vehicle Control Chips (VCCs) inside every vehicle regarding road and traffic conditions, directions, and so forth. This information can be displayed at the driver’s request. Driving a car without a VCC inside the Loop is illegal and cars without chips are refused entry at the gates.

The VCC allows police to track and, if necessary, shut down a vehicle remotely. If a vehicle runs a red light or stop sign, or exceeds the speed limit, the VCC issues a warning and automatically notifies the police computers. Automatic traffic tickets or arrest notices can then be generated. Only chipped cars can drive on the Millennium Highway, where the driver relinquishes direct control of his car to a massive computer located in City Center next door to City Hall. The computer is able to keep traffic moving at a standard 70 miles per hour.

Since the Loop opened in 1998, it hasn’t experienced a single automobile accident or loss of vehicle control. City officials hope to expand the system to cover the interstates and other major highways running through the city, but this would require federal permission.

Driving

Heroes, Dallas Kilroy